Severs Disease Physical Rehabilitation

Overview

Sever?s disease, also known as calcaneal apophysitis, is a common heel problem affecting children. This heel bone disorder is often painful, though it?s usually temporary and causes no long-term health effects. With Sever?s disease, the Achilles tendon repeatedly pulls on the heel?s growth plate, causing microtrauma (i.e. microfractures), inflammation, and swelling in the affected area. Sever?s disease is similar to Osgood-Schlatter disease, which affects the knee. Inappropriate footwear may be a contributing factor in the onset of this condition.

Causes

Sever?s disease is often associated with a growth spurt, when the bones grow but the muscles do not. Therefore the muscles effectively become tighter which results in increased stress at the heel. It may also be related to unusual biomechanics, for instance poor foot posture, muscle tightness or muscle weakness. Overtraining or incorrect training can also play a part. Usually, the cause is a combination of factors.

Symptoms

The most obvious sign of Sever's disease is pain or tenderness in one or both heels, usually at the back. The pain also might extend to the sides and bottom of the heel, ending near the arch of the foot. A child also may have these related problems, swelling and redness in the heel, difficulty walking, discomfort or stiffness in the feet upon awaking, discomfort when the heel is squeezed on both sides, an unusual walk, such as walking with a limp or on tiptoes to avoid putting pressure on the heel. Symptoms are usually worse during or after activity and get better with rest.

Diagnosis

Sever?s disease is diagnosed based on a doctor?s physical examination of the lower leg, ankle, and foot. If the diagnosis is in question, the doctor may order x-rays or an MRI to determine if there are other injuries that may be causing the heel pain.

Non Surgical Treatment

The initial treatment is rest, relieve the pain and treat the underlying cause. The foot and ankle should be rested so that the apophysis it is not being continually ?injured?. A small heel (sorbothane heel insert) raise can used to raise the heel and take the stretch off the Achilles tendon. It may be sufficient to stop your child playing sport but some children require a short period of bed or couch rest. Some children find resting very difficult and require the use of braces or plasters or boots to slow them down. Using crutches is advised. Severs is usually caused by tight muscles. A stretching program should be followed usually supervised by a physiotherapist. The stretching program may need to be undertaken up to 5 times a day. If flat feet are a problems orthotics (insoles) should be used. The pain should be controlled by rest (limiting activity) and ice (icing the painful area 3-4 times a day - making sure the skin is not burnt), Simple pain killers can be used such as paracetamol as well as anti-inflammatory tablets and cream. Severs disease usually goes away with time. When your child stops growing, the pain and swelling should go away because the growing (weak) area fuses and becomes solid bone which is very strong.

Prevention

It is important to undertake correct warm ups and warm downs before and after exercise. This should include a stretching routine. It may be necessary to undertake additional stretching outside of sport, especially during stages of growth. Only playing one sport should be avoided. You should not allow your child to play through pain.

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